Table Topics

Yesterday, my sister and I took a nine-hour road trip. That is a long time to sit and talk. We spent a lot of it discussing our memories of the past and hopes for the future.We talked about concepts as serious as racism and as light as what our favorite desserts are. Much of this conversation was fostered by a 4″ acrylic cube.

TableTopics

A few years ago, the Professor and I took a cross-country trip right after we had been given a Table Topics cube as a gift. The company’s website currently lists 15 different themes. Some are based on their intended audience, such as Girls Night Out. Others are topical, like Foodies or Sports. The cube contains 135 cards, each with a question. Vassie and I were using the original version. A few of the questions we answered were “What are your simple pleasures?”, “What do you complain about most?”, and “What is the best vacation you’ve ever taken?”

This is not a game per se–there are no wrong answers and no one keeps score. Its sole purpose is to get the ideas flowing and to provoke conversation around those ideas. The conversations will be as interesting and diverse as the people sitting around the table.

I bought our cube at the Landing in Renton, but it’s available at 10 locations in the Seattle area. I don’t know how widely distributed it is elsewhere. The company HQ is in California. Our friend bought it in Texas. So check out the “at a store near you” search link on their website. The item runs around $25.

About Verla

Wordfreak. Linguist. WA State licensed P.I. #3377. Principal, Viera Investigations. Spanish-English interpreter. Sole proprietor, Encanto Language Services. Erstwhile librarian. Texan by birth, cheesehead by upbringing, latina by soul, PacNWer by choice. Jewelry artist, Different Drummer Designs. Owner, world’s most gigantic dachshund. Driver, world’s almost smallest car. Chocoholic. Lover of things purple.
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One Response to Table Topics

  1. The Professor says:

    For those of our generation, this book is an excellent source of conversation starters:
    Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops?: The Lost Toys, Tastes, and Trends of the 70s and 80s.